The Research Cluster on Comparative Inequality and Inclusion draws on expertise from across disciplines to gain international and comparative perspectives on how to extend cultural membership to the greatest number in society, to better understand the social and cultural processes behind recognition gaps, and to determine how social scientists and policy makers can respond to help make societies more inclusive.

 

Affiliate Spotlight

Caleb Scoville_standing outside Caleb Scoville is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Tufts University, who is primarily interested in the political dimensions of environmental knowledge. His current book project on the case of the delta smelt, an endangered species of fish caught in the center of California’s “water wars,” and he is analyzing the dynamic interplay of extractive infrastructure, science, law, and public sphere controversy in response to water scarcity and biodiversity loss.

He is also engaged in collaborative research including one project on the moral regulation of European states by financial markets (with Marion Fourcade), and another on how artificial intelligence technologies are shaping the field of environmental conservation in the context of global warming (with Carl Boettiger, Millie Chapman, and Razvan Amironesei). Additionally, Caleb is in the planning stages of a new major project which will focus on how environmental and public health issues have become enrolled into America’s hyper-partisan “culture wars.”

Epicenter Podcast

Epicenter Podcast logoLaunched in January 2020, the Weatherhead Center's Epicenter podcast brings together scholars and experienced practitioners from different disciplines - giving listeners an opportunity to expand their everyday thinking about the world inside and outside their own borders.

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